News in brief

 

Just come back from another excellent event – this time the premiere of Mr Larrikin’s play Camusflage Krokodial at Hoxton Hall. I got to operate the follow spot, which was particularly exciting.

My poem ‘Swans in Thames’ has just been published by the very reputable London Magazine (hence the image above). Go buy it.

And on another note, I’ve been described as ‘confidently net-native’ by Mary Harrington on the Institute for the Future of the Book’s blog if:book. I think I exaggerated my time spent online though. I’m not that much of a geek. Am I? Okay, a little. Mary also namechecks the marvellous Master Dunthorne.

I’m currently working up a little think-piece about literature and the internet – specifically suggesting a number of useful analogies between contemporary and medieval literary culture – and will publish it here soon.

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Paternoster vs Babelfish

Thanks to George Ttouli for translating some work in progress that I’d posted up here using various Oulipian techniques. I think it was Joe Dunthorne who introduced me to The Oulipo via his brilliant univocalisms. The following is a version of The Lord’s Prayer which has been put through Altavista’s Babelfish software about fifteen times. The Lord’s Prayer is great for this kind of thing because of the familiarity of its rhythms, vocabulary and syntax. Ross Sutherland has an excellent version using the Oulipian device N7. Please feel free to post your own versions!

Paternoster vs Babelfish

The new star inside one sky art, name our clean clay/tone father. Our daily newspaper, O bread inside, this day is the n among them. There; a thing which will decrease inside the world. It wants to make us future life. It excuses our infringement, our things, which are average, there at the head, that one. Those hurt. And the inside, which it places at their temptation, for it bothers, but… Thine the glorious kingdom of hazards, quantity of adjustment. And thus it continues. Amen.